iPhone pros and cons

Compared with my previous cell phone and my BlackBerry, the iPhone’s touch-screen UI greatly increases the chance that at some point I am going to get hit by a car.

Better (very) late than never

Well! After years of running it without utilizing it I finally turned Movable Type into the publishing platform for the Ideapad. (Consider: this blog entry was originally dated January 10… talk about the cobbler’s kids having the worst shoes.) I now have comments, trackbacks and RSS, so I’m finally catching up to blog standards. Circa 2004 at the least.
The foot-dragging was twofold: one, my coding skills aren’t what they used to be, so I had a hard time getting the design just right (you’ll notice that I went for “reasonable facsimile” here); and two, my coding interest isn’t what it used to be, so I needed some good downtime to wade back into the MT templates and get things sorted out. I believe all the basics, including del.icio.us cross-posting, are functional.
Next up is porting over some of the archives, enabling Digg, and reminding the blog aggregators that this site isn’t static after all.

Got mine

iPhone
If you wanted an iPhone this weekend, you could have waited on line for three days, like some of the folks who made it into national newspapers, or you could have done what I did: roll into the Apple Soho store just after it opened at 9:30 Saturday morning, gotten on a very short line at the register, and walked out with one in roughly four minutes.
So far, it’s pretty terrific. The learning curve is short and the pleasures of the UI are long. Free wifi is easy to find in the city, so the major shortcoming cited in early reviews (AT&T’s slow EDGE data network) has not been a factor. And I can sheepishly report that the iPhone withstands a three-foot drop onto concrete without any damage to the system or the beautiful display, although my day-old gadget is nicely scruffed.
Also: the iPhone comes in a dedicated iPhone bag. Carrying this bag around Manhattan turns a person into a temporary rock star. The buzz around this device is truly astounding.

MovieWatcher

Sidenote to the two movie-centric posts prior to this one: With the Loews-AMC merger, AMC’s MovieWatcher customer loyalty program arrived in New York City for the first time. I had a MovieWatcher account in high school, and not unlike my Blockbuster membership I held onto my card for years. So when AMC appeared in my neighborhood, I went digging into my old wallets, found my card, and tried it—online, no less. And what do you know! My account is valid and I’m still in the system.

The account balance was empty, but I felt remembered, and I got a good chuckle out of my card’s longevity. I now use it every time I go to the movies and am once again partial to AMC theaters in my area.

Customers are as easily sated as they are angered. May as well aim high.

Got mine

<a href="/photos/iphone.jpg"><img src="/photos/iphone.jpg" border="1" alt="iPhone" width="512" height="384"></a>

If you wanted an iPhone this weekend, you could have waited on line for three days, like some of the folks who made it into national newspapers, or you could have done what I did: roll into the Apple Soho store just after it opened at 9:30 Saturday morning, gotten on a very short line at the register, and walked out with one in roughly four minutes.

So far, it’s pretty terrific. The learning curve is short and the pleasures of the UI are long. Free wifi is easy to find in the city, so I the major shortcoming cited in early reviews (AT&T’s slow EDGE data network) has not been a factor. And I can sheepishly report that the iPhone withstands a three-foot drop onto concrete without any damage to the system or the beautiful display, although my day-old gadget is nicely scruffed.

Also: the iPhone comes in a dedicated <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/19348052@N00/667385521">iPhone bag</a>. Carrying this bag around Manhattan turns a person into a temporary rock star. The buzz around this device is truly astounding.

MovieWatcher

Sidenote to the two movie-centric posts prior to this one: With the Loews-AMC merger, AMC’s MovieWatcher customer loyalty program arrived in New York City for the first time. I had a MovieWatcher account in high school, and not unlike my Blockbuster membership I held onto my card for years. So when AMC appeared in my neighborhood, I went digging into my old wallets, found my card, and tried it—online, no less. And what do you know! My account is valid and I’m still in the system.

The account balance was empty, but I felt remembered, and I got a good chuckle out of my card’s longevity. I now use it every time I go to the movies and am once again partial to AMC theaters in my area.

Customers are as easily sated as they are angered. May as well aim high.